The executive branch of the United States federal government is established in Article II, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution. Answer: 2 question How did Congress organize the executive branch of the newly formed United States in 1789? The President of the United States is the head of the executive branch. The legislative branch of the federal government, composed primarily of the U.S. Congress, is responsible for making the country’s laws. The framers of the Constitution invested the most essential governmental power — the power to make laws — within a legislative body composed of members chosen from each of the states, but put checks and balances on this central branch of government by the other branches, the executive and the judicial. The President of the United States is elected to a four-year term by electors from every state and the District of Columbia. - the answers to estudyassistant.com The Executive Branch conducts diplomacy with other nations, and the President has the power to negotiate and sign treaties, which also must be ratified by two-thirds of the Senate. The executive branch. Article II outlines the duties of the Executive Branch. The executive branch is headed by the president, who must be a natural-born citizen of the United States, at least 35 years old, and a resident of the country for at least 14 years. The electors make up the Electoral College , which is comprised of 538 electors, equal to the number of Representatives and Senators that currently make up Congress. Of these complaints, the lack of a bill of rights was the most effective. The members of the two The Constitution of the United States created the framework for the ruling government, separating powers and responsibilities among the executive, legislative and judicial branch. The Articles of Confederation were adopted by the Second Continental Congress on November 15, 1777, but did not become effective until March 1, 1781, when they were finally approved by all 13 states. Congressional oversight refers to the power of the United States Congress to monitor and, if necessary, change the actions of the executive branch, which includes many federal agencies.The primary goals of congressional oversight are to prevent waste, fraud, and abuse and to protect civil liberties and individual rights by ensuring that the executive branch complies with the … To ensure the government is effective and citizens’ rights are protected, each branch has its own powers and responsibilities, including working with … Under the Articles, the national government consisted of a unicameral (one-house) legislature (often called the Confederation Congress); there was no national executive or judiciary. The executive branch oversees the implementation and enforcement of all laws passed by the U.S. Congress—the legislative branch. Congress may override the veto with a two-thirds vote of each chamber, at which point the bill becomes law and is printed. The powers of Congress are delineated in Article I of the Constitution. A president is elected indirectly by the people through an electoral college system to a four-year term and is limited to two elected terms of office by the Twenty-second Amendment (1951). Congress, because of the `necessary and proper clause,' wielded too much power. The executive branch held too much power. To ensure a separation of powers, the U.S. Federal Government is made up of three branches: legislative, executive and judicial. The American people had just fought a war to defend their rights, and they did not want a intimidating national government taking those rights away again.